Flow Designer and Debugger

In the Workflow.com platform, the Flow Designer and Debugger are both visual environments. These visual designers provide an 'on-screen whiteboard' where all stakeholders can see and discuss the design-implementation.
For Both Business Users and Technical Users

For Both Business Users and Technical Users

The platform was designed with the business people in mind. Since the Flow Designer is a no-code environment, this is built to allow business people to not only understand, but also create and maintain business processes.

Self Validating Workflows

Self Validating Workflows

When creating or editing a workflow, the designer and debugger are self validating. This means you will be notified of issues that might break the workflow such as missing data, steps not connected properly, or invalid configuration values.

 

 

High Level Planning to Implement Complete Processes

High Level Planning to Implement Complete Processes

High level process planning can be created in the Flow Designer by using placeholder steps and other visual elements to plan and collaborate without getting into too many details. Designers can then evolve the high level business model, with additional steps in the toolbox, to create the finished application. These high level business models don’t go to waste after implemented, as they are often later used as diagrams in dashboards to display the status of the workflows to other team members.

Tracking Key Business Metrics

Tracking Key Business Metrics

Business Metrics in the Workflow.com platform are key business indicators that any step in a workflow can participate in. These business metrics can be displayed on dashboards and even be tied to alerts when changes are made to workflows in order to help improve an organization’s efficiency.

Nesting Flows as SubFlows

Nesting Flows as SubFlows

A workflow can be created as a single step that can then be incorporated into other workflows. This process is considered to be nesting a flow within another flow as a Linked Flow, or SubFlow. This not only helps organize large workflows, but is also useful when creating a process that can be used over and over again without ever being recreated. Linking workflows together is a natural process and allows you to move from one workflow to the next when editing so you can understand the overall process.

Dependency Browsing

Dependency Browsing

Workflow.com provides dependency browser that allows you to understand where items are using a design and where items the design is using. This is critical since the reuse and linking of different design elements is so easy in the platform. 

Branching, Merging, Looping

Branching, Merging, Looping

Since workflows are not always sequential and don’t always follow a ‘direct path’ from beginning to end, there are several control steps that help solve problems that:

  • Require you to do a certain activity a number of times
  • Iterate through a list and take action on each item in the list
  • Have a number of active tasks working at the same time (branching/merging)
  • Start workflows that are operated on another thread/scope
API Access

API Access

Integrations are easy in the platform, since when building a flow it automatically creates a specific service that can be used as SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) and/or REST (REpresentational State Transfer) to interact specifically with that flow.

A comprehensive suite of specific web services is also offered to allow developers to integrate with the workflows. A developer can search the system for flows, build up interactions, and run them using the SOAP or REST services.